German police sport bulletproof bras…

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German police women are to be issued with bullet-resistant bras.

The new underwear was developed as a second barrier of defence after normal bras were found to cause injuries while on duty, reports the Daily Telegraph.

The officers? bullet-proof vests, while stopping the force of gunshots in an attack, pushed the plastic & metal parts of their underwear into their flesh.

Carmen Kibat, a policewoman in Hamburg who tested the new underwear, said: ?These can save someone?s life so it?s not a laughing matter.?

She organised ?Action Brassiere? across Germany, getting hundreds of policewomen to try the bras out in the line of duty.

They are all emblazoned with the word ?police? and made from cotton, polyester, elastic and some other synthetic materials, thickly padded and with no metal or plastic studs or fasteners.

Three thousand front-line women police officers will now be required to wear the bras on duty. Their bosses have decided to allow them to have 3 each.

Ruediger Carstens, a spokeswoman for the police, said: ?This was pioneering work. The safety of our officers is paramount.?

Dogs can ?catch ? yawns too.

Scientists have discovered that, just like humans, pet dogs find yawns ?catching? too.

Until now, only humans and our close primate relatives were thought to find yawning contagious.

A team from Birkbeck College at the University of London wanted to know whether canines – known to be highly skilled at reading human social cues – could read the human yawn signal, reports the BBC.

The team tested 29 dogs by creating two conditions, each five minutes long, in which a person – a stranger to the dog – was sat in front of the animal and asked to call its name.

Under the first condition, the stranger yawned once the dogs had made eye contact with them.
?We gave the dogs everything: visual and auditory stimulus to induce them to yawn,? explained Birkbeck?s Dr Atsushi Senju.

The same procedure was followed in the second test, but this time the stranger opened and closed their mouth but did not yawn.

This was a precaution to ensure that dogs weren?t just responding to an open mouth.

The team found that 21 out of 29 dogs yawned when the stranger in front of them had first. By contrast, no dogs yawned during the test where the person did not yawn.

The researchers believe that these results are the first evidence that dogs have the capacity to empathise with humans.

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Russ joined Factory having completed his degree in Graphic Design at The Arts Institute at Bournemouth. Handling the rare combination of a mastery of both words and images, Russ lends his writing skills to his overarching responsibility for design and production scheduling. Russ loves building BMWs of both the 2 and 4 wheel variety.