bohemia beats Gordon

Eat Out Magazine names Bohemia Bar & Restaurant
26th best restaurant in the UK

Bohemia Bar & Restaurant is delighted to have been named the 26th best restaurant in the UK in Eat Out Magazine?s top 100 restaurants list, ahead of both Gordon Ramsay at Claridges and L’Atelier de Joel Robuchon.

The list is compiled through rigorous research, scouring the internet, restaurant guides, regional and local papers, trade publications and awards bodies for an ultimate top 100 list. Restaurants are given one point for every accolade received in 2007/8, including Michelin stars. Bohemia Bar & Restaurant was the only Jersey restaurant to make the list.

The accreditation adds to Bohemia?s already impressive record of recognition. In January, the talented and dedicated team celebrated news that they had retained a Michelin star for the fourth year running, and in 2005, the restaurant was named as one of the Top 25 UK Restaurants in Egon Ronay?s RAC Guide.
“To have Bohemia listed as one of the top restaurants in the UK again is a fantastic honour, especially by a leading industry magazine such as Eat Out?, says Lawrence Huggler, owner and Managing Director of the Club Hotel & Spa.
?To receive this accolade shortly after opening our stunning new Chefs Table, where customers get the chance to see what makes Bohemia so special, as well as our three new private dining rooms, makes it all the more rewarding?

how do you like them apples?

Is it a cider? Is it a sparkling wine? Close, it?s Pompette.

Introduced at the West Show only a few weeks ago and a must for fans of cider and sparkling wines or champagnes alike, La Mare Vineyard have let their latest trick from their innovative sleeves.

Keen to further the breadth of Genuine Jersey products and desperate to do their Jersey apples justice, the geniuses at La Mare have changed the way that they have produced cider since 1980 and enhanced their range by creating a cider that is fine as a champagne and as such is to be enjoyed in a flute. But it isn?t merely the presentation that is resplendent of a champagne.

Truly unexpectedly, the first thing that you notice upon tasting are the bubbles. Hundreds of tiny bubbles that instantly make you think of champagne before leading into much of the cider taste that you?d expect yet so delicate and light. At 7% it?s got a bit of a kick to it but as much as the final taste somewhat reminded me of one, this is no French farm cider. The secret is in the production.

Once picked, the apples are fed into a hopper, graded and shredded before passing through a fine mesh and series of rollers and being pumped into variable volume chambers that ensure that only the liquid is stored and allows no unnecessary air into the equation. What remains of the apples is ideal for composting.

As the brewing process continues, the necessary yeasts and other ingredients are added before the cider is bottled, capped and stored on its side. This allows any sediment to settle before the bottle inverted and left neck down so that the sediment is deposited at the ?top? of the bottle. Much like a champagne, the bottles are turned periodically before, and here?s the clever bit, the neck end of each bottle is inserted into a chilling device which freezes the top inch or so of the bottle so that when inserted into a clever machine that ?pops? the bottle, the frozen liquid containing the unwanted sediment shoots out leaving just the best bits.

What remains in the bottle is then topped up and given a ?dosage? of around 10ml sugar and brandy solution before a cork is inserted and the bottles make their way to the shop. The whole process takes months and the final result is well worth all of the care and effort that has gone into creating what is an ideal alternative to sparkling wines and a perfect excuse for an afternoon drink in the sunshine. At only £8.95 a bottle there?s no excuse not to either – bottoms up!